This past Friday night at the Solari Stadium at the So Pas High School, quarterback Noemi Howland outruns defenders for a senior score during their annual powderpuff game. Photo by Henk Friezer

The South Pasadena High School junior girls powderpuff team took on the girls seniors this past Friday night during their annual powderpuff flag football face-off.

The seniors prevailed in a big way, slapping down the juniors 60-0, in what is being characterized as the biggest lopsided score in the game’s history.

Traditionally, powderpuff games are played by the girls and coached by the boys in a flag-football contest. The term, powder puff, comes from the soft material used to apply face powder, according to the website, urbandictionary.com. The earliest game recorded may have been in 1931 at Western State College of Colorado.

Greg Luna, So Pas High School athletic director, summed up the local rendition as a good-natured game.

“I ran the clock last night,” Luna said in a text to The Review. “It was a great atmosphere with no injuries and only one tripping penalty. Both teams were in high spirits throughout the game.”

However, the game is taken seriously as it is refereed by professionals. In fact, some games have been known to turn into rough-and-tumble affairs. This past Friday night at the Solari Stadium at the So Pas High School was not one of them.

The score was perhaps the most lopsided victory in the long history of the game, according to those in attendance, and allows the seniors to claim the mantle of champions for at least a year.

Senior quarterback Noemi Howland scored the first points of the game on a touchdown pass. The seniors never looked back after that initial strike into the end zone.

Review Photographer Henk Friezer contributed to this story.

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Steve Whitmore is the editor for the South Pasadena Review. Steve has spent more than four decades as an award-winning print and broadcast journalist with a 16-year stint as the senior media advisor for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Steve comes to us from the Keene Sentinel in Keene, New Hampshire, where he covered politics and was a columnist.

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