A 6.4-magnitude earthquake, centered about 100 miles north of Los Angeles, was felt in South Pasadena and throughout the L.A. area on July 4 morning, but South Pas police reported no damage in the city.

It was the largest quake to hit Southern California since 1999, when a 7.1 magnitude hit in Twentynine Palms. Reportedly, Thursday’s quake was felt as far away as Las Vegas.

“We haven’t had one phone call, and there were no reports of damage from any of our L.A. (police) partners,’’ South Pasadena Police Sgt. Matthew Ronnie said shortly after the 10:33 a.m. temblor caused some rumbling, rattling of windows, and swaying of blinds and other household items.

The earthquake was centered in the Searles Valley in Kern County, and authorities in the city of Ridgecrest reportedly responded to dozens of emergency calls, though there were no immediate reports of fatalities.

Noted seismologist and earthquake expert Dr. Lucy Jones said on Twitter that Thursday’s quake was having “a robust aftershock sequence,” and that “plenty more aftershocks” could be expected later in the day and perhaps beyond.

Kevin Kenney, Review Editor
Author

Kevin Kenney, comes to The Review from the New York Post, where he most recently was an editor and web producer. He had previously been deputy night sports editor of the paper. A native New Yorker who now lives in Burbank, Kenney has also worked for United Press International, Gannett Newspapers, The Bergen Record of New Jersey, Fox Sports, The Santa Clarita Signal and the Southern California News Group, publisher of the Los Angeles Daily News and Orange County Register, among other papers.

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