Vector Path Hasting
Photo by Steve Whitmore

This unthinkable journey began back in 2016 when Donald J. Trump was elected President of the United States.

That’s when South Pasadena resident Vector Path Hasting, 55, decided he was going to run for president because he didn’t want the country to be under the spell of a tyrannical dictator. Thus, 2020 and the presidential election.

“I’m running for president because I am concerned that our last election may be our last election and that we are that far along,” Hasting said during an hour-long interview in The Review office before he embarked on a walking tour to the ocean. “I am running because there is a deep message here that America needs to grapple with. It is not too hard. It is not a bad message. It is a message of love, compassion and sharing that will carry us forward a long way through all our children and our descendants. I do not hear that message being said. I hear a lot of campaign, team-building, and this is part of the problem.”

Hasting has formed an exploratory committee and is anticipating formally announcing his campaign for the presidency next week. He will be joining the large crowd of Democrats already in the race. Hasting has lived in South Pasadena for 10 years, is married for two decades and has two children, 14 and 10.

“It takes a moment to slow down and hear what I’m saying,” he said. “We are the same old creatures that we were in the stone age. And we’ve built this amazing world of almost 8 billion people and we are on the cusp of a new Eden because things we didn’t even know 30 years ago turn out to be awesome. Human population will not get out of control. It is in the process of leveling off.”

There is a small twist to the Hasting campaign and that is the candidate’s name.

Hasting’s actual name is Henry McLaughlin. But he’s decided to change his name to Vector Path Hasting so he can run for president. He did not explain why he had to change his name, only that he was going to change his name.

“I’m deep into the process of completing the steps to run for president,” he said. “In fact, the last step I need to complete before I can go onto the website and legally file my candidacy correctly is to get my court-order changing my name. My natural-born name is Henry McLaughlin so I am legally changing my name next week by court-order.” 

Hasting also said that the country needs a flat-tax of 40 percent to ensure every American is treated equally and fairly.

“We need to change our tax code into a share,” he said. “Where everyone gets a tiny sliver of the economy. I mean every U.S. citizen of working age that’s not on social security should get this. They should get a tiny sliver of the economy that’s equivalent to the after-tax of a minimum-wage job. You take the flat-tax and make one big change to it. Each person would get a minimum of $20,000 annually before taxes. In order to pay for all of this you have the flat tax which nets that person $12,000.”

Hasting believes that $12,000 would make people feel more involved in the country.

“It makes everyone a taxpayer,” he said. “Which means everyone has skin in the game. You have some diminutive power.”

Hasting explained how this money would be distributed and that this must be done to prevent tyranny.

“This would be paid out bi-weekly straight from the IRS,” he said. “Basically this does two things. It marries the flat-tax with something called a guaranteed-base income. If you look this up you will see serious economists saying, ‘we have to do this,’ or we are going to end up with a dystopia of some kind.”

Hasting is convinced his presidential aspirations are not a long-shot or far-fetched. In fact, he said he believes his message should be adopted by all the candidates.

“These ideas are actually already out there,” he said. “They are gaining traction. I think they are gaining traction because they’re somewhat inevitable and if we don’t do them we run a much bigger risk in terms of our country’s security. All of our security is affected because we don’t have enough. We now have people that have too much. When you use your money, your power, to force people to live in horrible conditions, then you have too much money. There are a lot of tyrants in the world that do that and the prime example is the current administration. This is a tyrannical regime that is at the risk of becoming the norm. This is why I’m running for president of the United States.”

With that, Hasting left The Review office in South Pasadena and begin his solo walk to the ocean.

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Steve Whitmore is the editor for the South Pasadena Review. Steve has spent more than four decades as an award-winning print and broadcast journalist with a 16-year stint as the senior media advisor for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Steve comes to us from the Keene Sentinel in Keene, New Hampshire, where he covered politics and was a columnist.

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